Language Services2018-09-05T14:10:15+00:00

Language Services

Language Services is committed to building bridges through communication. We do this by empowering organizations and the community at large with the resources needed to communicate with our Limited English Proficiency (LEP) population.

We assist LEP clients — helping them gain access to goods and services — and the organizations and businesses that serve them. Some areas in which we provide linguistic services are medical, legal, professional and educational settings.

Our network of interpreters help clients overcome linguistic and cultural barriers, and they are trained to adapt to the complexity or sensitivity of a given situation.

Services include the translation of written, electronic and multimedia material to and from English and native foreign languages. Materials include but are not limited to business, legal, medical, technical and other documents.

In-person

Schedule Interpreters: Appointments can be made via our online scheduling system, fax or email. When using our online system (login and password is given to current clients; call us to become one) you will be able to modify pending appointments, and get an overview and queries of any past and future appointments.

On-site-working

Our on-site interpreters can assist any organization or business with an ongoing need for interpreters. These interpreters spend three or more hours, two or more days each week on a regular basis at your site, but are our employees — making it an affordable option minus any HR hassle. If you are interested, please contact Language Services at languages@archlou.org or 502-637-9786.

We provide written transcripts from recorded audio or video footage of conferences, assessments, testimony, interrogations, business meetings and other instances where an interpreter is used. The format of the document will be tailored to your specification. However, just as with translation of documents, the limit of our work is the unwritten language. Some languages are spoken languages only, and there are no symbols used to represent the sounds of the spoken word.